Persian leopard

The Persian leopard is the last remaining Panthera species in Iran after the extinction of the Asiatic lion Panthera leo persica and the Caspian tiger Panthera tigris virgata. The leopard has therefore a unique importance for the ecological health of wide areas of natural ecosystems in the country and for the cultural heritage of Iran. The Persian leopard has been widely distributed in West, South and Central Asia since the times of the Pleistocene, but became extinct in some areas. Iran’s mountainous north is home to the greatest concentration of Persian leopards left on earth. Larger than their African cousins, Persian leopards once roamed far into the Caucasus Mountains in central Asia, including parts of Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia. Now, only scattered populations of these big cats remain in those countries, often in isolated patches far removed from others of their kind. Iran is leopards’ best chance for survival. Expanding villages, encroaching livestock and busy highways destroy habitat and create hazards for such a wide-ranging predator. In recent years, a new indirect threat has emerged as well: economic sanctions.

Persian Leopard

 Although Iran has an impressive number of parks and protected areas, herders sometimes graze their livestock in prohibited zones. When leopards occasionally kill vulnerable cows or sheep, the herders poison the carcasses to get rid of the offending predator. Cubs are born with their eyes closed, eventually opening after 4-5 days. Their fur is thicker than that of adult Persian leopards. Weaning occurs at 3 months, by which time they start following their mothers on hunting trips. They make it out of their juvenile year only around 50% of the time, as out of a litter of four, only two reach adulthood. Being obligate carnivores, they eat ungulates like roe deer, goitered gazelle, West Caucasian tur, mouflon, wild boar, and onager. However, they can adapt to changes in their diet, depending on food availability. They spend a solitary life, except during the mating season and when a female is raising her cubs. Individuals have well-pronounced territories marked by ground scraping, tree scratching, and urine spraying. These leopards roar and growl threateningly, a trait that they share with tigers, lions and jaguars. It is because a part of their voice box, is actually replaced with a ligament, enabling them to stretch it to have a bigger sound passage, resulting in a wider pitch range.

Persian Leopard

Persian Gazelle

There are three species of gazelle in Iran, including Persian Gazelle, Jabir Gazelle and Mountain Gazelle. Persian Gazelle is the most abundant gazelle species in Iran; unfortunately, in 2008, it was added to the list of vulnerable and endangered animal species of IUCN. The species lives in 15 protected areas in Iran, among which Mouteh Wildlife Refuge is one of the largest populations of Persian Gazelle depending on natural ecosystems. Examining the cytochrome b region in a number of conserved areas of the species showed that all of them belong to a pure population of Persian Gazelle; however, the gazelles living in different habitats are significantly different from each other. Biometric studies on the skull indicated that the gazelles living in the Eastern and Western Zagros Mountains of Iran are distinct from each other.

Persian Gazelle

Persian gazelle mostly feeds on plants with high protein content. Indian or Jabir gazelle is another species of gazelle living in Iran, which is considered as protected and endangered species in the country. Unfortunately, their species status has been so far controversial; thus, it has been not put on the IUCN list. However, there are strong morphological and molecular evidence suggesting that the animal belongs to the Jabir Gazelle species. This species is very similar to the Persian gazelle, but smaller in body size. It should be noted that three subspecies of Jabir gazelle have been identified in Iran. The Mountain gazelle is another species of Iran’s gazelles, which shows more specification in the body color than other species. The only habitat of this species is in the Faroor Island in the Persian Gulf. In general, the three valuable species of Iran’s gazelles are currently in need of need serious protection and support in order to prevent the extinction of such valuable biological resources and preserve them for future generations.

Persian Gazelle

Persian Gazelle is larger than other species in Iran regarding body size, and the antlers are only seen in males. At present, the species lives sporadically in Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, northern Tibet, southeastern Turkey, the Caucasus, Turkmenistan and some plains of Iran. It should be noted that the evidence and the taxidermied sample remained from Dasht-e Moghan gazelles indicate that the gazelles in the plain have been of the geographical races of this species.

Persian Cat

Persian World states that although the history of where this cat originated may be sketchy, breeding programs for Persians began in Italy and France as far back as the 16th Century. The breeding program advanced further and the development of the Persian as known today began in Great Britain. Persians were entered in the first cat shows in Great Britain in the 1800s, and they were a popular pet at the time. By the early 1900s, Americans began to import Persians into the United States. The Persian is usually a medium sized cat, although she is massive and heavily boned. With her masses of fur, she can appear larger than she really is. While there is no particular weight range the Persian should fall in, these cats should be full bodied and balanced. The Persian is an extreme-looking breed. The body is short, but thick with thick legs and a short, thick neck. The tail is short and the ears are small. The head is round with large, round eyes. When viewed in profile her face is flat and the nose changes direction so that what is seen is mostly the colored flesh on her nose.

Persian Cat

The coat on a Persian is thick, full and long. It is fine, but should be lustrous and glossy. The ideal Persian coat has a fine texture and is long, thick and glossy. Variety is truly the spice of life when it comes to coat colors. This breed is divided into no less than seven separate coat color groups, with plenty of choices in each. You can find Persian cats in just about every solid color including black, blue, chocolate, red, lilac, cream and white. Most solid colors are accompanied by copper eyes, except for white Persians that either have copper, blue, or odd-eyes.

 A Persian’s head is easily its most distinctive feature. It’s larger and generally rounder than that of the average cat, with large, round, wide-set eyes and a sweet expression. The ears are fairly small with rounded tips, and they should be set wide apart and tilted slightly forward. The cheeks are also quite round, and the short nose appears to be aligned with the eyes. Some Persian cats have the traditional “doll face” whereas others have a flatter face that is sometimes called “Peke face” because it’s like a Pekingese dog. The flat face Persians tend to be more popular at cat shows but also tend to have more health problems than doll face Persians.

Persian Cat

Mesr Desert

One of the most beautiful natural manifestations in Iran tourism is its deserts. Mesr Village is located in the Isfahan province near the Khur and Biabanak County. Less than 50 kilometers from the city of Jandaq and about 30 kilometers from Khur, lies an amazing desert the beauty of which attracts many tourists from both inside and outside Iran. It is a vast, enormous area in the middle of Dasht-e Kavir.  In Mesr Village, people earn money by animal husbandry, farming and renting houses to the tourists. Water of the village is prepared from the wells. We have explained about Mesr Village before and you can read the article of it by clicking on the link below. A severe drought occurred, so Joseph was forced to dig some wells. For several years, people used the water of the wells until it was finished. Again, Joseph dug some wells and since the Prophet Joseph was in Egypt, people of this village named here Mesr which is the equivalent of Egypt in Persian. Only a few percent of the Mesr Desert is covered with plants. The Vegetation coverage encompasses halophyte plants such as Tamaris trees, Haloxylon trees and bushes. The animal coverage area consists of animals such as wolf, jackal, hyena, sand fox, sand cat, lizard, chameleon, a variety of lizards, snakes, scorpions, dull-yellow partridge, eagle, hawk and others cause of lots of food and water. Mesr Village which is accessible via public transport is in a close distance from Khur. Shenzar Guesthouse, a beautiful guesthouse in the village belonging to a hospitable family, provides an opportunity for travelers to experience traditional desert houses and Iranian toothy foods. Barandaz Tabatabai Caravanserai is one of the best accommodation in traditional style in the Mesr Desert.

Mesr Desert

The camel herds and camel riding between the Mesr Village’s sand hills add to the interesting aspects of the desert. ATV motors and off-road SUVs are provided there with experienced drivers. Just say a word and then Experience a sweet and ebullient ride in your entire life. Both vehicles, reach the summit of sand hill fast and then move down the hill with extraordinary thrill. Another widely known attraction of the area is called Khur salt lake, a salty land covered with hives-like shapes formed by salt. All in all, the experience is definitely great for anyone interested in adventure travel.

Mesr Desert

Tehran National Garden

The National Garden is one of the buildings on Imam Khomeini street, which was known as the icon of the Tehran before the they create of Azadi Tower and is today one of the spectacular Iran attractions. The National Garden was built during the Qajar era and saw many changes in subsequent years. The National Garden was originally the gateway to the Mashgh Square, which was very important at that time. Shortly after building the gate, the first public garden entitled “National Garden” was founded in the lands of Mashgh square and so it has been renamed to “The Gate of National Garden”. It was then turned into a public park for a short while, and eventually important governmental offices and museums were constructed around it. In the upper part of the building, monitoring station, timpanist and the armed forces passage have been designed. The Gate of National Garden has a gateway for car pass and two for pedestrians.

Tehran National Garden

Mashgh Square and this beautiful courtyard are built in Qajar dynasty. The square area was a military area and the Imperial military force practiced there, and this site was built at the time of Fath Ali Shah for this purpose. This area also had a central barrack, which the military forces were organizing there at that time, and therefore became known as the Mashgh Square. This Square was constructed during the period of Fath Ali Shah Qajar and was launched during Nasir al-Din Shah Period. At that time, a beautiful gate was constructed for the Mashgh square, which comprised with a two-arched door in south- eastern side of the field, and was known as the Naseri door, where in some days Nasir al-Din Shah, from above, Watched the military.

Tehran National Garden

The National Garden is one of the architectural monuments of Iran which is a combination of Iranian and European architectural style and is more visible in paving and tile work. The National garden base, its eight columns and the legs of the pillars are made of brick. The exterior inscriptions are decorated with poems and in its tiling design they used two lions, leopards, lions and sun and machine guns. The building, which was originally intended as the gateway to the Mashgh Square, after a long time after its construction, the plan to create the first park or public garden in the city of Tehran was landed on this Square, and after that the name of the gate changed to the National Garden.

Tehran National Garden

Mashhad

Mashhad is Iran’s holiest and second-largest city. The city is laid out in a roughly circular shape, with the religious edifices and monuments located in the centre and avenues radiating outward to approximately 12 neighborhoods, such as Malekabad, Sajjad, Shahrak-e Azadi, Kuy-e Imam Reza, and Sisabad. Not just a religious city, Mashhad is called the holy city of Iran because it is home to the tomb and shrine of Islam’s eighth Shia Imam, Imam Reza. Every year millions of pilgrims from around the world flock to this shrine, giving it a palpably spiritual and multinational feel. As one of the most magnificent religious places in Iran, Astan Qods Razavi is the symbol of Mashahd where the Islamic art and religion are linked to each other. Located along the Silk Road, it is the economic capital and the intercontinental commercial center in the Central Asia. Mashhad economic activities are dependent on the services, industry and agriculture; however, it is focused on a services-based economy due to the presence of the passengers and pilgrims who travel to there. About 40 percent of Mashhad industry is relied on the food, metal and handicraft industry. Tourism based on pilgrimages to the shrine of Imam Reza is a key part of Mashhad’s economy.

Mashhad

Most of Mashhad people are of Iranian Aryan race, although many Kurds, Turks and Arabs live there. Mashhad is a multiethnic city that includes Persians, Baluchis, Daris, Hazrajatis, Turkmen, Uzbeks, Tajiks, Kurds, and Lurs among its residents. Residents speak in Persian Language, Mashhadi accent and they are the followers of Ja’fari Shiite. Mashhad is the site of a prominent institution of higher education, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, which has colleges of humanities, mathematics, natural sciences, theology, education, and veterinary medicine.

Mashhad

Mashhad is a good place to buy carpets with its own special carpet plans. Mashhad is also known for gemstones. The area with 39 known different varieties of gemstone is rich enough to export gemstones to many other countries. It has about 90 percent of gemstone workshops of the country which produce jewelry in addition to religious accessories such as rosaries and rings. Also the most expensive spice in the world which is Saffron is produced greatly in Mashhad.

Mashhad

Pasargadae

Pasargadae is the first dynastic capital of the Persian Achaemenian dynasty, situated on a plain northeast of Persepolis in southwestern Iran. Pasargadae was built by the first great Persian king, Cyrus the Great, as his palace and showpiece. Cyrus deserves his special place in the history of modern Persia. He began as a ruler of a petty kingdom in the southwestern corner of the habitable part of modern Iran. It was a totally new concept of a garden city that established many of the principles of what became Persian architecture. Pasargadae has in fact one really superb piece of architecture: it is the tomb of Cyrus, situated right on the edge of the main palace complex.  The tomb of Cyrus still stands almost intact, its simple lines and massive strength a perfect foil for its upland location. Constructed of huge white limestone blocks, its gabled tomb chamber rests on a rectangular stepped plinth, with six receding stages.

Pasargadae

Pasargadae stands as an exceptional witness to the Achaemenid civilization. The vast Achaemenid Empire, which extended from the eastern Mediterranean and Egypt to the Hindus River in India, is considered the first empire to be characterized by a respect for the cultural diversity of its peoples. This respect was reflected in the royal Achaemenid architecture, which became a synthesized representation of the empire’s different cultures. Pasargadae represents the first phase of this development into a specifically Persian architecture which later found its full expression in the city of Persepolis. Within the boundaries of the archaeological site of Pasargadae are located the known elements and components necessary to express the Outstanding Universal Value of the property, including the tomb of Cyrus the Great, the remains of the Tall-e Takht fortified platform, and the remains of the royal ensemble within the Four Gardens. The ancient capital extended much beyond the inscribed property, but has not yet been excavated.

Pasargadae

It is best to imagine Pasargadae as a group of garden pavilions in a park: essentially a camp of nomads, but made out of natural stone. Stylistically, the Audience Hall, Residential Palace, the garden pavilions A and B, and the Gate belonged to the architectural tradition of the Iranian nomads, who lived in large tents. However, Cyrus used elements from other cultures as well: sculptures from the Assyrian palaces were used as models, work may have been done by stonemasons from Greek Ionia, and a hybrid demon guarded the gate.

Pasargadae

Tabriz

Tabriz is one of the oldest and biggest cities of Iran on the hillside of the Sahand Mountain which is surrounded by mountains in the north, south and east and flat lands as well as the Talkherud salt marsh in the west, like a partly big hollow or a plain with fantastic view among the mountains, at the height of 1350 to 1550 m above the sea level in different areas. Having some of most famous museums, holding some of the cultural events, and harboring a couple of the most prestigious Iranian universities, the city is considered a major hub for science and culture in Iran. Tabriz was named by the Organization of Islamic Conference as the city of the Islamic world tourism. Tabriz was the residence of the crown prince under the Qajar kings. Tabriz has a high political and economic position and best-known as the “Cradle of Investment” due to the ability to attract large investments from private sectors. It is ranked 1 in attracting investment among Iran cities for five consecutive years.

Tabriz

The main industrial productions of this area are foodstuffs, chemicals, non-metallic mineral, basic metals, textiles and carpet machinery.  In addition, Tabriz has been a heavy industrial center including machinery and equipment industries. It is a leading center for Leather production, in addition to being famous for the other arts and handicrafts, for a long time. Tabriz and Maragheh handmade carpets are famous in all around the world due to their specific design and high quality that their export is considered as one of the significant sources of foreign exchanges in Iran.  Today, Tabriz people speak in Turkish language and this city was the capital of Shia in all around the world and most of its residents are followers of Asna Ashari Shia.

Tabriz

With a very rich history, Tabriz used to house many historical monuments. Unfortunately, many of them were destroyed in repeated invasions and attacks of foreign forces, negligence of the ruling governments, and natural disasters such as earthquakes and floods. What remains now mostly dates back to the Ilkhanids, the Safavids, and the Qajars. Some of the monuments are unrivaled masterpieces of architecture. The most famous monuments of Tabriz are buildings like the Blue Mosque, El Goli Garden, Shahrdari Square, Sa’at Tower and so on.

Tabriz